Great Characters John F. Kennedy

He was a brilliant speaker, a fine strategist and an innovative politician, adored like a celebrity. During his short presidency, John F. Kennedy wrote international history. With the John F. Kennedy Special Edition, Montblanc pays tribute to one of the most beloved and influential presidents of the United States.

John F. Kennedy – politician, visionary, pioneer and style icon

In the eyes of the world, John F. Kennedy represented a new generation, a political wind of change and the hopes of an entire nation. His charm and intelligence quickly made him a star of the political stage, from which he left a lasting mark on society and political life in the United States.

Three initials that have written history

During his one thousand days as president, Kennedy succeeded in restoring trust in a country that had fallen victim to racial riots and the threat of the atomic bomb. Yet his time as the head of the United States was cut short. On November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, he was assassinated while riding in the presidential limousine. The world will forever remember "JFK" - three initials that wrote history.

Amherst

1 / 26

When power corrupts, poetry cleanses. For art establishes the basic human truth, which must serve as the touchstone of our judgment.

Remarks at Amherst College upon receiving an Honorary Degree, October 26, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Amherst

2 / 26

...The highest duty of the writer, the composer, the artist is to remain true to himself and to let the chips fall where they may.

Remarks at Amherst College upon receiving an Honorary Degree, October 26, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Amherst

3 / 26

A nation reveals itself not only by the men it produces but also by the men it honors, the men it remembers.

Remarks at Amherst College upon receiving an Honorary Degree, October 26, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Amherst

4 / 26

If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him.

Remarks at Amherst College upon receiving an Honorary Degree, October 26, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Amherst

5 / 26

When power leads man towards arrogance, poetry reminds him of his limitations.

Remarks at Amherst College upon receiving an Honorary Degree, October 26, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Berlin

6 / 26

Freedom is indivisible, and when one man is enslaved, all are not free.

Speech at the Rathaus Schöneberg in West Berlin, Germany, June 26, 1963

Berlin

7 / 26

All free men, wherever they may live, are citizens of Berlin. And therefore as a free man, I take pride in the words: »Ich bin ein Berliner«

Speech at the Rathaus Schöneberg in West Berlin, Germany, June 26, 1963

Frankfurt

8 / 26

Partnership is not a posture but a process – a continuous process that grows stronger each year as we devote ourselves to common tasks.

Address in the Assembly Hall at the Paulskirche, Frankfurt, West Germany, June 25, 1963

Frankfurt

9 / 26

Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.

Address in the Assembly Hall at the Paulskirche, Frankfurt, West Germany, June 25, 1963

Greenville, North Carolina

10 / 26

A man may die, nations may rise and fall, but an idea lives on. Ideas have endurance without death.

Remarks recorded for the opening of a USIA transmitter at Greenville, North Carolina, February 8, 1963

Houston, Texas

11 / 26

The greater our knowledge increases, the more our ignorance unfolds.

Address at Rice University on the nation’s space effort, Houston, TX, September 12, 1962

Nashville

12 / 26

...Liberty without learning is always in peril, and learning without liberty is always in vain.

Nashville at the 90th Anniversary Convocation of Vanderbilt University, May 18, 1963

New York

13 / 26

Mankind must put an end to war or war will put an end to mankind.

Address before the General Assembly of the United Nations, September 25, 1961

New York

14 / 26

We must use time as a tool, not as a couch.

Address in New York City to the National Association of Manufacturers (496), December 5, 1961, Public Papers of the Presidents: John F. Kennedy, 1961

New York

15 / 26

Children are the world’s most valuable resource and its best hope for the future.

United States Committee for UNICEF, July 25, 1963, Box 11, President‘s Outgoing Executive Correspondence Series, White House Central Chronological File, Presidential Papers, Papers of John F. Kennedy.

New York

16 / 26

...Peace does not rest in charters and covenants alone. It lies in the hearts and minds of all people.

Speech before the 18th General Assembly of the United Nations, September 20, 1963

New York

17 / 26

My fellow inhabitants of this planet: Let us take our stand here in this Assembly of Nations. And let us see if we, in our own time, can move the world to a just and lasting peace.

Speech before the 18th General Assembly of the United Nations, September 20, 1963

Pueblo, Colorado

18 / 26

A rising tide lifts all the boats.

Remarks in Pueblo, Colorado following approval of the Fryingpan-Arkansas Project (336), August 17, 1962, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1962

Washington, D.C.

19 / 26

The great revolution in the history of man, past, present and future, is the revolution of those determined to be free.

Message to Chairman Khrushchev concerning the meaning of events in Cuba, April 18, 1961

Washington, D.C.

20 / 26

If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.

Inaugural Address in Washington, January 20, 1961

Washington, D.C.

21 / 26

I am certain that after the dust of centuries has passed over our cities, we, too, will be remembered not for victories or defeats in battle or in politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit.

Remarks at a closed-circuit television broadcast on behalf of the National Cultural Center (527), November 29, 1962, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1962

Washington, D.C.

22 / 26

...for a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people.

Remarks on the 20th anniversary of the Voice of America, February 26, 1962

Washington, D.C.

23 / 26

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words but to live by them.

Proclamation 3560 - Thanksgiving Day, November 5, 1963

Washington, D.C.

24 / 26

This country cannot afford to be materially rich and spiritually poor.

Message to the Congress on the State of the Union (12), January 14, 1963, Public Papers of the President: John F. Kennedy, 1963

Washington, D.C.

25 / 26

We shall be judged more by what we do at home than by what we preach abroad.

Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 14, 1963

Washington, D.C.

26 / 26

...Our most basic common link is that we inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future. And we are all mortal.

Commencement Address, American University, June 10, 1963

John F. Kennedy Special Edition

In tribute to one of the most charismatic political figures in modern history, the special edition John F. Kennedy features numerous details evoking Kennedy's life and accomplishments. The blue precious resin recalls his career in the U.S. Navy, the platinum-plated clip is engraved with his initials, JFK, and the three platinum-plated rings on the cap represent Kennedy's three brothers.

A vision was turned into reality

In reference to the Apollo space program, a project that was dear to his heart and which carried with it America's hopes and dreams, the handcrafted 14 K gold nib has been engraved with the lunar module that made this vision a reality in 1969. Available as a fountain pen, rollerball or ballpoint pen, this Special Edition is crowned with the Montblanc emblem in precious resin.

Great Characters John F. Kennedy ink

Through its very name, "Navy Blue", the ink of the John F. Kennedy Special Edition evokes Kennedy's greatest passion: navigation. The specific color is only available as a limited edition.

Cuff links

The oval cuff links pay tribute to an exceptional, charismatic figure. The inlaid blue resin, fashioned with the greatest care to create an optical effect evoking a textile ribbon, exemplifies exquisite personal taste and classic elegance.

Go to Limited Editions

During his life, John F. Kennedy had one great passion: maritime navigation. The John F. Kennedy Limited Edition 1917, available as a fountain pen, rollerball or ballpoint pen, makes great allusion to this, from the surface that evokes rigging under the lacquer of the body and cap to the lifebuoy of JFK's Victura, finely engraved on the 18 K gold nib.

A larger-than-life personality

The naval star that adorns the cone of the writing instrument is an allusion to Kennedy's career in the U.S. Navy, as are the colors of the American flag: red, white and blue. The engraving that decorates the cap's ring is inspired by Kennedy's campaign for the presidency, which he won in 1960 with his slogan, "A time for greatness". FInally, the number of pieces in the edition - 1917 - represents the birth year of this exceptional politician, who accomplished so much in a period of great international tension. These writing instruments will be available from January 2015.

1917 Edition cuff links

Created in tribute to John F. Kennedy, an icon of unparalleled charisma and style. Sheathed in gleaming blue lacquer, the cuff links will complement any outfit, offering infinite possibilities for highlighting the unique personality of their owner.